AskDefine | Define wedge

The Collaborative Dictionary

Wedge \Wedge\ (w[e^]j), n. [OE. wegge, AS. wecg; akin to D. wig, wigge, OHG. wecki, G. weck a (wedge-shaped) loaf, Icel. veggr, Dan. v[ae]gge, Sw. vigg, and probably to Lith. vagis a peg. Cf. Wigg.] [1913 Webster]
A piece of metal, or other hard material, thick at one end, and tapering to a thin edge at the other, used in splitting wood, rocks, etc., in raising heavy bodies, and the like. It is one of the six elementary machines called the mechanical powers. See Illust. of Mechanical powers, under Mechanical. [1913 Webster]
(Geom.) A solid of five sides, having a rectangular base, two rectangular or trapezoidal sides meeting in an edge, and two triangular ends. [1913 Webster]
A mass of metal, especially when of a wedgelike form. "Wedges of gold." --Shak. [1913 Webster]
Anything in the form of a wedge, as a body of troops drawn up in such a form. [1913 Webster] In warlike muster they appear, In rhombs, and wedges, and half-moons, and wings. --Milton. [1913 Webster]
The person whose name stands lowest on the list of the classical tripos; -- so called after a person (Wedgewood) who occupied this position on the first list of
[Cant, Cambridge Univ., Eng.] --C. A. Bristed. [1913 Webster]
(Golf) A golf club having an iron head with the face nearly horizontal, used for lofting the golf ball at a high angle, as when hitting the ball out of a sand trap or the rough. [PJC] Fox wedge. (Mach. & Carpentry) See under Fox. Spherical wedge (Geom.), the portion of a sphere included between two planes which intersect in a diameter. [1913 Webster]
Wedge \Wedge\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Wedged; p. pr. & vb. n. Wedging.] [1913 Webster]
To cleave or separate with a wedge or wedges, or as with a wedge; to rive. "My heart, as wedged with a sigh, would rive in twain." --Shak. [1913 Webster]
To force or drive as a wedge is driven. [1913 Webster] Among the crowd in the abbey where a finger Could not be wedged in more. --Shak. [1913 Webster] He 's just the sort of man to wedge himself into a snug berth. --Mrs. J. H. Ewing. [1913 Webster]
To force by crowding and pushing as a wedge does; as, to wedge one's way. --Milton. [1913 Webster]
To press closely; to fix, or make fast, in the manner of a wedge that is driven into something. [1913 Webster] Wedged in the rocky shoals, and sticking fast. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]
To fasten with a wedge, or with wedges; as, to wedge a scythe on the snath; to wedge a rail or a piece of timber in its place. [1913 Webster]
(Pottery) To cut, as clay, into wedgelike masses, and work by dashing together, in order to expel air bubbles, etc. --Tomlinson. [1913 Webster]

Word Net

wedge

Noun

1 any shape that is triangular in cross section [syn: wedge shape, cuneus]
2 a large sandwich made of a long crusty roll split lengthwise and filled with meats and cheese (and tomato and onion and lettuce and condiments); different names are used in different sections of the United States [syn: bomber, grinder, hero, hero sandwich, hoagie, hoagy, Cuban sandwich, Italian sandwich, poor boy, sub, submarine, submarine sandwich, torpedo, zep]
3 a diacritical mark (an inverted circumflex) placed above certain letters (such as c) to indicate pronunciation [syn: hacek]
4 a heel that is an extension of the sole of the shoe [syn: wedge heel]
5 (golf) an iron with considerable loft and a broad sole
6 something solid that is usable as an inclined plane (shaped like a V) that can be pushed between two things to separate them
7 a block of wood used to prevent the sliding or rolling of a heavy object [syn: chock]

Verb

1 fix, force, or implant; "lodge a bullet in the table" [syn: lodge, stick, deposit] [ant: dislodge]
2 squeeze like a wedge into a tight space; "I squeezed myself into the corner" [syn: squeeze, force]

English

Pronunciation

Etymology

wegge, wecg

Noun

  1. One of the simple machines; a piece of material, such as metal or wood, thick at one edge and tapered to a thin edge at the other for insertion in a narrow crevice, used for splitting, tightening, securing, or levering (Wikipedia article).
    Stick a wedge under the door, will you, it keeps blowing shut.
  2. A piece (of food etc.) having this shape.
    Can you cut me a wedge of cheese?
  3. A flank of cavalry acting to split some portion of an opposing army, charging in an inverted V formation.
  4. A type of iron club used for short, high trajectories.
  5. Wedge-heeled shoes.
  6. In the context of "colloquial|UK": A quantity of money.
    I made a big fat wedge from that job.
  7. A group of geese or swans when they are in flight in a V formation.

Synonyms

Translations

One of the simple machines
  • Chinese: (pǐ), (xiē), 楔形 (xiē xíng)
  • Czech: klín
  • Danish: kile
  • Dutch: wig, spie
  • Finnish: kiila
  • French: coin (for splitting something), cale (for stopping something from moving)
  • German: Keil, Weck
  • Hungarian: ék
  • Italian: cuneo
  • Japanese: (くさび, kusabi)
  • Korean: 쐐기 (sswaegi)
  • Latin: cuneus
  • Lithuanian: vagis
  • Middle English: wegge
  • Old English: wecg
  • Old High German: weggi
  • Old Norse: veggr
  • Polish: klin
  • Portuguese: cunha
  • Russian: клин
  • Spanish: cuña
  • Swedish: kil
piece of food etc.
  • French: part, morceau
golf club
  • French: cale
flank of cavalry
  • Swedish: kil
group of geese or swans

Verb

  1. To support or secure using a wedge.
    I wedged open the window with a screwdriver.
  2. To force into a narrow gap.
    He had wedged the package between the wall and the back of the sofa.
  3. To work wet clay by cutting or kneading for the purpose of homogenizing the mass and expelling air bubbles.

Translations

seealso The Wedge
The term wedge can refer to any of the following things:
Concrete objects:
  • Wedge (mechanical device), a simple machine used to separate two objects, or portions of objects, through the application of force
  • Wedge (golf), a specialized type of club used at short ranges
  • Potato wedges, large chunks of often unpeeled fried potatoes
  • A name for a submarine sandwich in Westchester and Putnam Counties, New York, USA & Fairfield County, Connecticut, USA
  • A range of sports cars from British manufacturers TVR
Natural phenomena:
Abstract concepts:
  • Wedge (geometry), a polyhedral solid defined by two triangles and three trapezoid faces
  • Wedge product, a mathematical term related to the exterior algebra (or the Grassmann algebra) of a vector
  • Wedge sum, in mathematics, a "one-point union" of a family of topological spaces
  • Wedge issue, in politics, a divisive issue used to split the support base of an opposing political group
  • Wedge strategy, a Creationist political action plan
  • In phonetics, a name for the International Phonetic Alphabet symbol, ʌ, representing the open-mid back unrounded vowel
  • Stabilization Wedge Game, in climatology, a concept developed to demonstrate that global warming is a problem which can be solved by implementing today's technologies to reduce CO2 emissions
Organisations:
  • Wedge Card, a social enterprise started by the founder of The Big Issue, John Bird, to promote local business, shops and communities.
  • Wedge Community Co-op, a cooperative grocery in Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States.
  • Wedge Records, a record label
People and characters:
  • Wedge (Transformers), an Autobot, leader of the Build Team in the "Transformers: Robots in Disguise" toy line
  • A poker champion
  • Wedge Antilles, a fictional character in the Star Wars films.
  • A recurring character in the Final Fantasy video game series: see Biggs and Wedge
wedge in Danish: Kile
wedge in German: Wedge
wedge in Spanish: Cuña
wedge in French: Wedge
wedge in Italian: Cuneo (disambigua)
wedge in Dutch: Wig
wedge in Polish: Klin (ujednoznacznienie)
wedge in Russian: Клин
wedge in Simple English: Wedge
wedge in Swedish: Lista över golftermer#Wedge
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